• Empecemos a darle a las SENTENCES: Aprendiendo con La Loca, Lesson IV

    Yeah, yeah, I know what you're thinking...




    Bue, no precisamente eso, pero algo parecido porque... ¡Acá VUELVE la Loca para empezar a analizar clases de ORACIONES!

    ¡Los domingos son perfectos para aprender gramática!
    WHATEVS...

    "¿Clases de oraciones?", preguntarán, "¿En serio? Wow Me interesa mucho..."

    CRI
    CRI
    CRI


    Si! Exacto! (con voz de Dora, la Exploradora)

    Let's begin...

    (ESTA EXPLICACIÓN VA A SER MUY PERO MUY BREVE)


    (Oración Simple)

    ➱➱ Has a SUBJECT and a PREDICATE.
    ➱➱Has one Independent Clause (Independent Cl: Main Clause; a clause that can stand on its own, en otras palabras, que tienen sentido por sí solas)

    OK, so this one's easy. Nomás acordarse esta fórmula:
    SUBJECT+FINITE VERB

    En palabras simples, Un sujeto y un VERBO CONJUGADO.

    Ejemplos:

    "I'm reading"

    Un poco más rebuscada:

    "I'm studying hard"

    O sino:

    "He bought me a new book today"

    A TENER EN CUENTA:

    ➱➱Las Simple Sentences sólo pueden tener UNA

    combinación de Sujeto-Predicado

    ➱➱¡No se usan comas!




    ➱➱Has, at least, TWO independent clauses: 2 SUBJECTS
                                                      
                                                                          2 PREDICATES

    ➱➱ Clauses have equal importance and can stand on their own. (Y se llaman: COORDINATE MAIN CLAUSES)

    They are linked by:

    • ➱➱; (semi-colon: "We searched all day; we didin't find the ring")
    • ➱➱ ; + Adverb: "We searched all day; however, we didin't find the ring."

    ➱➱Coordinated Conjunction

    ➱➱ Hay 4 tipos de conjunciones:

    Cumulative: 


    Addition (add one statement to another)

    Se usan:

    AND: "She likes to read AND write"

    And/THEN: "He bought the book AND THEN read it"

    Not only...BUT: "He NOT ONLY washed the car BUT 

    polished it."

    ALTERNATIVE:


    Choice between one notion or another.

    Se usan:

    OR: "He either speaks English, OR undestands it"

    ELSE

    OTHERWISE: "I can be an english teacher, otherwise I can be a blogger"

    NEITHER: "He neither watches Buffy, nor he watches Angel"

    Adversative


    Contrasts one notion and another

    Se usan:

    BUT 
    YET
    HOWEVER
    NONETHELESS
    DESPITE
    STILL


    ILLATIVE

    One notion is implied, inferred or proved by another.

    THEN
    THUS
    FOR
    THEREFORE: "Frank is a smart detective; therefore, he will find out who did it.
    SO "He couldn't find the pencil, SO he used the pen"



    ➱➱ ONE INDEPENDENT CLAUSE + ONE SUBORDINATE (or dependant) CLAUSE 

    ➱➱ Introduced by a SUBORDINATE CONJUNCTION: Because, Before, When, As long as, Except That.

    S.C. May function as:

    NOMINAL CLAUSE: "He told me that the match had been cancelled"; "I didin't know WHAT he meant"

    ADJETIVAL CLAUSE: "Holiday resorts, WICH WERE VERY CROWDED, are not pleasent"

    ADVERBIAL CLAUSE: ➱➱ Identified by asking ➱➱ WHEN?; WHERE?; HOW?; WHY? (Todo ésto lo explicaré en otro post)


    ➱➱ 2 or more INDEPENDENT CLAUSES +

    SUBORDINATE CLAUSE


    "Although Frank is a good detective, he hasn't yet solved the murder, and he hasn't found anyone 
                         (I.CL.)                                        (I.CL.)                                           (S.CL)

    who could be a possible suspect."


    UFFFFFFF

    ¡ESTO FUE BASTANTE DIFÍCIL DE RESUMIR!

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